Revenge porn can ruin your life

Thirty-four states, including the Washington D.C., have criminal laws against nonconsensual porn, also known as revenge porn.
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Addison Hawkins and his ex-girlfriend dated for two years in high school. Their social media photos show a smiling, silly couple—two teenagers in love.

During their relationship, the two also took intimate photos of each other, a common occurrence amongst teenagers in the era of smartphones.

"They were for my eyes only and her eyes only,” Hawkins said.

But then the two broke up. It wasn’t on good terms, according to Hawkins, adding his ex-girlfriend's anger towards him kept building.

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“I was at home and someone called me and said, 'Hey, you need to look at her Twitter,’” Hawkins said.

What he found shocked him: She had posted one of their intimate photos.

Hawkins said he asked her to remove the photo, but she wouldn’t. Feeling helpless, he went to police and pressed charges.

"I felt like she needed to answer for it," Hawkins said.

Across the country, 34 states and Washington D.C. have criminal laws against revenge porn.

She was charged in adult court with unlawful disclosure of intimate visual material, commonly known as revenge porn, a Class A misdemeanor in Texas. If convicted, she could face up to one year in jail. Because she's 17, we chose not to identify her.

 
"That's not something that those kids are thinking about, I guarantee you,” said Sgt. Jeff Lee, a high-tech crimes investigator. “They're thinking about getting even is what it is. They're thinking about embarrassing somebody else.”

Hawkins' ex-girlfriend said she spent two days in jail during the booking and bonding process. She said she didn't know posting the photo was a crime.

“I didn't even know I was getting in trouble for it until they arrested me," she said. "For what? For a picture? For a picture.”