A look back at the 1979 eclipse, when snow ruined the show

Eclipse drawing frmo 1979 WBIR eclipse package
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We're just days away from the total solar eclipse that will turn the skies over part of United States dark for a few moments on August 21.

East Tennessee is very fortunate to have a prime view of this celestial event, which was not the case back in 1979, when the last total solar eclipse was visible in North America.

RELATED: Full eclipse coverage

Back then, the line of totality passed through the northwestern part of the country, and into Canada. 

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Tennessee was expecting to see about 61% of totality that day, but it didn't really work out. The weather on that winter day did not cooperate--- with more than three inches of snow falling from very overcast skies. It's very unlikely anyone in the Knoxville area saw much that day.

However, WBIR still marked the occasion with a story from reporter Scott Sams, focusing on the history of solar eclipses, and their place in popular culture. It's worth a watch!  Technology and television news have certainly changed a lot since then!