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Boston Marathon bombing kills 3, injures over 120

9:27 PM, Apr 15, 2013   |    comments
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Update 9:00 p.m.

By JIMMY GOLEN / Associated Press

BOSTON (AP) -- Police say at least three people have been killed in the explosions near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

Police commissioner Ed Davis confirmed the three deaths but provided no details.

The explosions Monday also injured more than 130 people, knocking spectators and at least one runner off their feet.

Some of the victims lost arms and legs. Other injuries included broken bones, shrapnel wounds and ruptured eardrums.

Update 8:20 p.m.

By JIMMY GOLEN / Associated Press

BOSTON (AP) -- Authorities say bombs that exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon have killed two people and injured more than 120.

Eight hospitals report that they are treating at least 124 people. Of those, at least 15 are in critical condition.

The injuries ranged from cuts and bruises to amputations. Many victims suffered lower leg injuries and shrapnel wounds. Some suffered ruptured eardrums.

Dr. Richard Wolfe, chief of the department of emergency medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, says one or two of the hospital's 21 patients faced a "high probability of mortality."

Update 5:26 p.m.

by Michael Winter, USA TODAY

At least two people died and 23 others were injured Monday after two blasts ripped through the crowd near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

Police said an hour later, a third explosion hit the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library, about eight miles from the race finish. No injuries were reported, but nearby universities were being evacuated.

Police found and detonated a third device along the race course, Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said at a news briefing.

A federal law enforcement source told CNN the the devices was "low flashpoint," and did not appear to have shrapnel inside.

OBAMA: White House ready to assist Boston

Police Commissioner Ed Davis said the explosions occurred in quick succession, 50 to 100 yards apart, about 2:50 p.m. on Boylston Street near the intersection of Exeter Street, three hours after the winner had crossed the finish line.

"We're encouraging people to not go out, if they're in hotels to stay in their rooms," said Davis said.

He said at least one was detonated in a controlled explosion along the marathon route, but that no additional devices have been found.

"After this incident occurred, there were a lot of people running from the scene, a lot of them deposited bags and parcels," Davis said. "Each one is being treated as a suspicious device. At this point, we haven't found any more devices."

Bloodied spectators were carried to medical tent intended for runners. Several of the injured had lost limbs, and at least one police officer was hurt.

"Somebody's leg flew by my head. I gave my belt to stop the blood," spectator John Ross told The Boston Herald.

Police reported at least 23 were injured, but hospitals reported receiving more patients.

Massachusetts General Hospital was treating 19 victims, spokeswoman Susan McGreevey said. Tufts New England Medical Center had nine patients "and we're expecting more," said spokeswoman Julie Jette. Brigham and Women's Hospital reporting they have 18 to 20 injured from the explosions, two critical.

That would put the injured total at 46 to 48. The Boston Globe reported 64 people wounded.

Organizers immediately stopped the race and locked down the marathon headquarters.

The Federal Aviation Administration announced a temporary flight restriction over Boston.

The elite women runners started the race at 9:30 a.m. and the elite men followed about 30 minutes later. About 27,000 runners were in the field for the Patriots Day race.

Smoke hung over the neighborhood as police cleared the thousands of spectators who had jammed the route.

Joe Difazio, of Wakefield, Mass., was working on communications at the race and was near the explosion. He says there was one explosion and five seconds later there was another of the same intensity. It was at a barricaded area near the finish line.

"There were so many people in that area that they couldn't get ambulances in there. They were wheeling people out in wheelchairs," he said. "One guy had no legs. The bones was just sticking out... It was horrible."

Nancy Costa, a medical student from Reading, Pa., was running with her friend Jill Edmonds of Salem, N.H., when the explosions erupted.

"It was insane here. Everyone was running. I was right next to the explosion. It threw me," she said. "I never sprinted so fast after a marathon.

"The first (blast) threw me onto the ground. And everything went silent and then the second went off and I just covered my head and got up and started sprinting. Everyone was screaming and people were getting trampled. We finally found an open T (subway train) that just arrived in Wellington (station). We had to walk a few miles to find one open."

Kimberly DelGuzzi of Pittsburgh was waiting on Boylston Street for her friend to cross the finish line when she found herself pressed against a building, ducking for cover from the blasts.

"At first, I thought it was fireworks, but then I saw the smoke go up in the air," she DelGuzzi, who was standing between the two explosions. "Then, not even a minute later, the second one went off."

She described the scene as "mass chaos" and said, "Oh my God, it was loud."

"The explosions shook everything," she said, her voice still shaking 40 minutes after the bombs went off. "I saw runners down in the street. I saw people down on the sidewalk."

DelGuzzi, 41, has run numerous marathons but was not running in Boston. Her friend reported she was OK.

Tom Beusse, president of the USA TODAY Sports Media Group, had just finished the race and was about 150 yards away from the explosion.

"I finished the race and began to walk through the corrals," he said. "All of a sudden there was this giant explosion. All of us turned around, the runners, and had these looks on their faces like 'Oh my god.' ... Immediately, it turned into mayhem. People were screaming. Cops told us to keep moving away from the finish line in the direction we were going. No one knew what was coming next -- and thankfully, nothing was next."

The final 100 meters of the race is lined with bleacher seating, reserved for race officials and invited guests. The area on Charles River, on the north side Boylston Street is open to the general public. At the corner of Hereford and Boylston Streets, there is a Boston EMS Medical Tent and a fire station.

The Mandarin Oriental hotel on Huntington has been evacuated. A hotel employee who did not provide his name said all businesses on the block had been evacuated as a precautionary measure.

There is relative calm in the streets, no signs of panic. A volunteer EMT said all resources public and private have been called in for response.

President Obama has been notified of the incident in Boston. His administration is in contact with state and local authorities. He directed his administration to provide whatever assistance is necessary in the investigation and response.

The New York Police Department has stepped up security around landmarks in Manhattan, including near prominent hotels, in response to at least one explosion near the finish line of the Boston marathon on Monday, said Paul Browne, deputy commissioner of the NYPD.

Browne told Reuters that New York police were re-deploying counter-terrorism vehicles around the city.

Contributing: Susan Davis, Oren Dorell, Roxanna Scott, Donna Leinwand Leger, Aamer Madhani, Linda Dono, Elizabeth Weise, USA TODAY.

Copyright 2013USA TODAY
 

Update 5:00 pm

BOSTON (AP) -- Boston police say there's been a third explosion in the city, following two blasts near the finish line of the Boston Marathon that killed two people and injured many others.

Police Commissioner Edward Davis says authorities aren't certain that the explosion at the JFK Library was related to the other blasts, but they're treating them as if they are.

David says there are no injuries stemming from the third explosion.

He urged people to stay indoors and not congregate in large groups.


Update 4:14 p.m.

Boston Police Department reported on their official Twitter account that two people are dead and 23 injured after two explosions went off near the Boston Marathon finish line Monday. 

According to the AP, intelligence officials found two more explosive devices at the marathon, and they're in the process of dismantling them.

Witnesses said the blasts occurred in quick succession about 2:50 p.m. on Boylston Street near the intersection of Exeter Street, three hours after the winner had crossed the finish line. Some store fronts were blown out.

Bloodied spectators were carried to medical tent intended for runners. Several of the injured has lost limbs, and at least one police officer was hurt.

Organizers immediately stopped the race and lockdown the marathon headquaters.

The elite women runners started the race at 9:30 a.m. and the elite men followed about 30 minutes later. About 27,000 runners were in the field for the Patriots Day race.

"There are a lot of people down," one man, whose bib No. 17528 identified him as Frank Deruyter, told the Associated Press.

Editor's Note: Earlier USA Today reported that Fox News quoted a law enforcement source saying there are at least three people dead and The Boston Herald reported at least a dozen injuries.  Boston Police Department is now reporting the explosions killed two people and 23 injuries.

Previous Story

Two explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon have resulted in injuries.

Bloody spectators were being carried Monday to the medical tent that had been set up to care for fatigued runners. Police wove through competitors as they ran back toward the course.

"There are a lot of people down," said one man, whose bib No. 17528 identified him as Frank Deruyter of North Carolina. He was not injured, but marathon workers were carrying one woman, who did not appear to be a runner, to the medical area as blood gushed from her leg. A Boston police officer was wheeled from the course with a leg injury that was bleeding.

About three hours after the winners crossed the line, there was a loud explosion on the north side of Boylston Street, just before the photo bridge that marks the finish line. Another explosion could be heard a few seconds later.

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