Mosquitos love you? Hate cilantro? Own a dog? Your DNA may tell you why

Your DNA can determine things like whether mosquitoes like to bite you, if you have migraines, and if your more likely to own a dog!

Millions of Americans are fascinated with their heritage---- digging into their family tree to find out about their ancestors. The newest trend in finding out where we came from is genetics, a scientific process being brought to the masses by websites like Ancestry.com and 23andme.com.

DNA genetic testing can show what part of the world your ancestors came from, identify possible health issues that run in your family, and even help you find long-lost relatives.

Genetics also determine things like your eye color, if your hair is curly or straight, or whether you have a widow's peak or dimples.

WBIR's Robin Wilhoit will delve more deeply into DNA testing on 10News at 6 on Monday and Tuesday, as she follows an adopted East Tennessee woman's quest to learn more about her biological family.

Until then, here are a few fun facts about what DNA can reveal about you, courtesy of 23andMe.com.

GENETICS DETERMINE YOUR SUSCEPTIBILITY TO MOSQUITOS

There are 15 genetic variants associated with your attractiveness to mosquitos, the size of welts, and the intensity of the itch.

‘MORNING PEOPLE’ TEND TO WEIGH LESS…

Genetic researchers found that people who identify as morning people were less likely to be obese as well as less likely to be underweight.

YOUR DNA PLAYS A ROLE YOUR MIGRAINES.

44 genetic variants are associated with migraines, pointing to vascular dysfunction as one of the bioligial underpinnings for the disease.

MOTION SICKNESS IS VERY HERITABLE…

Genetics accounts for a large reason why some of us, one in every three people, are more prone to motion sickness than others

LOVE THE TASTE OF CILANTRO?

To some people, cilantro tastes soapy, and genetics are to blame. Scientists discovered a genetic variant near the gene OR6A2 associated with thinking cilantro tasted like soap.

AUDIBLE EATING… BAD MANNERS OR GENETICS?

About 25 percent of women and 19 percent of menp. 

reported being "filled with rage" by the sound of others eating, a genetic trait called misophonia.

BATTLE OF THE SIBLINGS…

Genetics have revealed that first-born children start to read earlier, take more advanced math classes, an tend to be more outspoken.

Second-born children are more altruistic, less tense, and tend to own a dog.

 

© 2017 WBIR.COM


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