President Trump to pick 3 top prosecutors in Tennessee

Attorney General Jeff Sessions' call for the resignation of federal prosecutors appointed by the Obama administration will include Nashville U.S. Attorney David Rivera.

A spokesman for Rivera's office confirmed Friday afternoon the office had been notified of Sessions' directive seeking the resignations of 46 United States attorneys who were appointed during the prior presidential administration. Rivera, who was not available for comment Friday, was nominated by President Barack Obama and began his post in 2013.

There are a total of 93 U.S. attorneys, including three in Tennessee.

West Tennessee federal prosecutor Edward L. Stanton III announced in February he would be resigning his post. Earlier this week he said would join Butler Snow law firm in Memphis. Stanton had been nominated by Obama for a judicial seat, but was never confirmed by the U.S. Senate.

Nancy Harr, the acting U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Tennessee, said after the November election she was ready to return to the courtroom. Her chance to keep the top role as a Democratic appointee was doomed by the election of President Donald Trump.

In a statement Friday, the Justice Department said Sessions' request was similar to ones made in past presidential transitions. The appointment processes are expected to take months.

U.S. attorneys often champion specific issues on which to focus resources, and can shift the focus of their offices to mandates from the leadership of the U.S. Department of Justice.

In addition to filling all three U.S. attorney jobs in the Volunteer State, the Trump administration is expected to fill several federal judgeships in the state. There are two current or upcoming vacancies — half the bench — in Middle Tennessee, as well as two in West Tennessee.

READ MORE: What a Trump tenure means for courts in Tennessee

The Associated Press contributed to this report. Reach Stacey Barchenger at 615-726-8968 or sbarchenger@tennessean.com or on Twitter @sbarchenger.

This story originally appeared on The Tennessean’s website.

© Gannett Co., Inc. 2017. All Rights Reserved


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