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(WBIR) Roane County is benefiting years after one of America's worst man-made environmental disasters.

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has already spent more than $1 billion on cleanup at the 2008 coal ash spill in Kingston.

Now that cleanup is close to finished, TVA is donating some of that equipment to the Roane County Highway Department.

TVA started giving the department materials last year; Monday, crews with Roane Co. started picking up 167 jersey barriers. Each one normally costs $2,500 a piece.

Road Superintendent Dennis Ferguson leased two acres of land to store the equipment given to them by TVA.

"It saved my budget a lot," he said.

The lot holds all kinds of road materials including drain tile, pipes and barriers. Not counting the jersey barriers, the department's received about $174,000 in materials.

"As a county, I could never afford to do this, stock pile this up, but over the years we can use it," Ferguson said.

Some of the material they have used to replace old pipe on Old Jones Road in Midtown.

"By being able to get this stuff by TVA, we're able to do other things. So we can purchase other things, do more paving, do more patching, more mowing, things of that nature," Ferguson said.

The Roane County Sheriff's Office is also benefiting from the donated equipment. Instead of buying a fence, they will use the jersey barriers at their compound.

TVA Spokesperson Travis Brickey said most of the donated equipment is suited for the highway department.

However, TVA is also donating surplus materials to the cities in Roane County. The county's school district received other items, such as lab equipment and furniture.

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