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An East Tennessee college building is now closed off to students after authorities found hazardous materials inside of it Thursday.

The City of Knoxville confirmed to 10News early Friday afternoon that state officials are inspecting the A.K. Stewart science building at Knoxville College in North Knoxville.

Both the the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation and the US Environmental Protection Agency are helping with the effort, according to a city spokesperson.

The city said TDEC first arrived on the campus Thursday to examine the building. After that, TDEC alerted the EPA about the materials. That federal agency is now in the process of assessing the hazards that were found.

No agency has revealed exactly what substance was discovered. WBIR 10News also has yet to learn whether the materials inside the building present a danger to residents or students who are nearby its location on campus.

Knoxville College and TDEC have not commented on the situation.

Currently, yellow caution tape is wrapped around A.K. Stewart science building. On Friday, the city's fire marshal office also placed a "notice to vacate" sign on the structure's front door.

The sign read the notice was issued "pursuant to section 110.2 of the International Fire Code". That code authorizes a fire department official "to order the immediate evacuation of any occupied building deemed unsafe when such building has hazardous conditions that present imminent danger to building occupants."

The city said the EPA and TDEC will likely release more information next week.

Knoxville College was founded in 1875. In recent years, efforts have been made to cleanup parts of the campus.

A new ministry announced plans to rehab parts of the campus in 2013. UT-Battelle also presented a $30,000 gift to the college in 2006 to improve the A.K. Stewart science building.

The entire campus has been placed on Knox Heritage's Fragile 15 list for the year 2014.

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