From the "Flying Tomato" to Beatlemania, these are the top five things you need to know today.

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Olympics: All eyes on Shaun White

Today at the Olympics, eight gold medals are up for grabs, and all eyes will be on Shaun White, trying for his third in a row on the halfpipe, which has been fraught with problems. Much work has been done to address concerns that have been raised for days, but the riders set to compete are still worried about the conditions they face in the biggest competition of their careers

1 Year ago, Benedict's announcement changed church

It was the quietest of announcements that had the effect of a thunder-clap on the Catholic world: A year ago today, Pope Benedict XVI said in a voice so soft that cardinals strained to hear (and in a Latin not all could easily follow) that he was becoming the first pontiff to resign in more than half a millennium.

Winter storm to slam the South

This seemingly relentless winter of 2013-14 is forecast to bring yet another round of snow and ice to the southern USA today. The same storm could then head up the East Coast later in the week, unleashing a blast of winter misery across the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal Monday added 31 counties to a state of emergency he declared earlier in the day, bringing to 45 the number of counties covered by the declaration as a double-barreled winter storm heads toward the state.

It was 50 years ago: Beatles' first U.S. concert

Fifty years ago today, The Fab Four performed their first concert in America to a packed crowd of more than 8,000 screaming fans, mostly teenagers, on a blustery, snowy night in the nation's capital. Just two nights after their introduction to the country on The Ed Sullivan Show, the foursome rocked the Washington Coliseum with 12 of their hits, opening with Chuck Berry's Roll Over Beethoven and closing with Little Richard's signature hit Long Tall Sally.

Yellen faces first grilling before Congress

Janet Yellen, who today faces her first grilling by Congress since she became the Federal Reserve chair this month, is expected to reiterate central bank plans to taper its stimulus despite recent weakness in the economy. Yellen is scheduled to deliver her semi-annual testimony on monetary policy before the House Financial Services Committee.

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