In response to the flash flood event in Cummins Falls where a 2-year-old died after being swept away and dozens of adults had to be rescued, National Park officials are warning visitors to use caution around other area waterfalls, especially when heavy rain is expected. 

RELATED: Tennessee park officials identify 2-year-old who died after heavy flooding at Cummins Falls

Since the park was founded in the 1930s, around 60 people have drowned. 

Around a third of those deaths were at waterfalls, with many of them at Abrams Falls, The Sinks and Ramsey Cascades. The park does not forbid swimming but also does not recommend it.

Abrams Falls

National Park officials say the falls are only 20 feet high, but a large amount of water flows over them. They caution hikers not to climb on the rocks because they tend to be slippery and many people have been injured of the years.

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Abrams Falls. GSMNP

APRIL 28, 2016: Man drowns at Abrams Falls in GSMNP

The Sinks

This is a popular spot along Little River Road, but park officials say you should be careful when you visit. The Little River flows through it, and the waters can rise quickly.

The Sinks Heavy Rain Great Smoky Mountains Smokies Waterfall
The Sinks waterfall in the Great Smoky Mountains a few days after more than a week of heavy rains hammered the mountains.
WBIR

August 4, 2014: Man injured during hike at the Sinks

Ramsey Cascades

This is the tallest waterfall in the park, according to the National Park Service. Officials caution hikers not to climb on the rocks because they tend to be slippery and many people have been injured of the years.

A submitted photo of Ramsey Cascades. The National Park Service says the falls are running high from recent rains.
A submitted photo of Ramsey Cascades. The National Park Service says the falls are running high from recent rains.

May 31, 2017: Park Service warning hikers after man falls to his death in Smokies

For water safety tips, visit the National Park Service website. 

RELATED: Gawkers relish rain-soaked waterfalls in Smokies