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Conservation center offers help if you report injured wildlife

The coyote fell down the side of the mountain and landed in a drainage canal that sits right behind their backyard.

PHOENIX — The wildlife is what Raymond Facio and Brittany De Soto love about their home which sits cradled in the South Mountain range in Ahwatukee.

“The coyotes apparently have a den up the way,” said Raymond Facio.

It may have been one of those coyotes Raymond saw take an unexpected fall.

“Behind this brush and paloverde tree. The little coyote was sitting up there and I looked out the window and I see him tumbling down,” said Facio.

The coyote fell down the side of the mountain and landed in a drainage canal that sits right behind their backyard, breaking two legs.

The couple wanted to help the poor pup.

“I have respect for the wildlife around us and nobody should suffer,” said Brittany De Soto.

They called one agency but they were going to euthanize the coyote. That was not acceptable for De Soto.

“I wanted to give him a fighting chance,” said De Soto.

They searched the internet for help and found the Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center in Scottsdale, who picked up the injured animal.

“The goal is to get them brought into here. So, we can rehabilitate them and fix whatever is fractured and injured,” said James O’Brien, one of the vet techs at SWCC.

Sadly, the non-profit sanctuary was unable to save the coyote because of internal injuries. However, they have saved hundreds of other lives.

O’Brien says those that can’t be released for their own safety will make the Center their permanent home.

“We get animals in almost daily sometimes,” said O’Brien.

While the coyote couldn’t be saved, De Soto appreciates SWCC for trying to save its life.

“What it boils down to, It’s life. We have to have respect for the wildlife around us,” said De Soto.

The Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center says if you come across an injured animal, call them. If you would like more information, visit https://www.southwestwildlife.org/