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Doctors concerned about daylight saving time depression combined with pandemic

According to the Cleveland Clinic, doctors are already seeing more cases of low-grade depression with the COVID-19 pandemic lasting months.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Overnight we “fell back” as daylight saving time ended. Some doctors are concerned that this change combined with the COVID-19 pandemic could magnify cases of low-grade depression.

When it starts getting darker outside earlier, it's a sign of the season that daylight saving time is over.

According to the Cleveland Clinic, doctors are already seeing more cases of low-grade depression with the COVID-19 pandemic lasting months.

The toll the pandemic is taking on mental health combined with the lack of sunshine may make people feel more depressed.

"With COVID-19 we have so much change. So much unpredictability. So much uncertainty. The target is always moving as to what we know and what we don't know and how things change and it's unnerving," said Jane Pernotto-Ehrman, a behavioral health specialist with Cleveland Clinic

To boost your mood behavioral health specialists suggest getting enough sleep, keeping a daily routine, and getting some fresh air outside.

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Mediation can also help.

And bright light first thing in the morning, even a lamp, can be energizing.

In addition, experts recommend acknowledging your feelings, expression and releasing them by writing them in a journal or talking with someone you trust.

"Refocus to the good in your life. We woke up today. You feel good? You have clothes on? You have food in the fridge? You have clean water coming out of the tap? You're doing better than a lot of people in our communities and in the world," said Ehrman.

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