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How to protect your home security cameras from hackers

With surveillance cameras expected to be a popular Christmas buy this year, it's important to know what safety steps you can take to stop hackers in your home.

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Multiple families across the U.S. have reported strangers hacking into their home security cameras-- including one in Memphis.

With surveillance cameras expected to be a popular Christmas buy this year, it's important to know what safety steps you can take to stop hackers in your home.

Tech experts say when you place security cameras that connect to the internet in your home, you run the risk of hackers invading your privacy. Luckily, though, there are extra precautions you can take.

Security cameras are meant to make us feel safe and secure. But when a stranger's voice came from the other side of a security camera in a Memphis family's 8-year-old daughter's room, the LeMay family felt anything but.

"They could have watched them sleeping, they could have watched them changing, they could have seen all kinds of things," Ashley LeMay said, the girl's mother, said.

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Similar instances were reported in Texas, Georgia and Florida. Now, tech experts like Luke Wood with Allevia Technology are urging families to take the proper steps for more security.

He said it starts with your Wi-Fi.

"They're on your network," Wood explained. "They're on the network at your house. So they by nature can only be as safe as the network at your house is. You know that's kind of how they work."

Wood urges families to change their Wi-Fi password from the default and to make sure camera accounts are set up safely too.

"Security is like an onion. The more layers you have, the better," Wood explained.

He encourages using two-factor authentication on your account.

"So make sure if anyone tries to login to your app as you, they are required to also have something with them," Wood mentioned. "They need your cell phone to get a code texted or authenticator app or have access to your email to be able to get a code."

Don't share your login information with anyone and use a strong password that you change regularly.

"Because if I have your password I just download the app and login and voila! I've got functionality into whatever you've got," Wood noted.

Make sure to update your apps to ensure your systems are getting the necessary security upgrades.

Wood also says if you're unsure about how to do something, just ask-- whether it's a tech expert, relative or Google.

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