Appalachian Unsolved - The Podcast is a WBIR original podcast. New episodes are released on Sundays. 

From mysterious disappearances in the Great Smoky Mountains to decades-old murders, Appalachian Unsolved investigates East Tennessee's infamous cold cases. This is Appalachian Unsolved - The Podcast.

It is an extension of WBIR's television series called 'Appalachian Unsolved'. You can read up on every cold case we've covered here

Podcast FAQs:

What is a podcast? Well, technically a podcast is an audio file. But to make it simple, a podcast is basically internet-radio but on demand. 

Where do I listen to the podcast? You can listen to the podcast on several platforms including iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, Stitcher, and PodBean.

Who is talking? WBIR anchor and reporter Leslie Ackerson and WBIR investigative reporter John North narrate the podcast. The two work on the television series together including conducting interviews, talking with investigators, and researching the cold files.

Episodes:

  • (newest at top)
The bodies of four women turn up at a notorious lover's lane. The main suspect - a man on the street nicknamed "The Zoo Man." His lawyers said one of his multiple personalities really did it. The prosecution insists that was a farce. The story of one of Ea...

5. THE SERIAL KILLER WHO GOT AWAY WITH MURDER

The bodies of four women turn up at a notorious lover’s lane.  The main suspect – a man on the street nicknamed “The Zoo Man.”

His lawyers said one of his multiple personalities really did it. The prosecution insists that was a farce.

The story of one of East Tennessee’s first serial killers – who authorities say got away with murder.

RELATED: Appalachian Unsolved: The serial killer who got away with murder

Popular radio host Gus Gossert once had thousands of music fans who listened to his broadcasts of the golden oldies. Then a gunman shot him to death off a remote road in West Knox County. Was it drugs? Money? Revenge over a woman? More than 40 years later it's still an unsolved killing.

4. WHO KILLED THE DOO-WOP DJ?

Popular radio host Gus Gossert once had thousands of music fans who listened to his broadcasts of the golden oldies.

Then a gunman shot him to death off a remote road in West Knox County.

Was it drugs? Money? Revenge over a woman?

More than 40 years later it’s still an unsolved killing.

RELATED: Appalachian Unsolved: Who killed the Doo-wop DJ?

J.T. Lutz was spending a quiet night at home with his young family when a shotgun blast shattered the window. The Greene County man had vowed to help authorities catch a thief. Somebody else thought differently. Lutz's murder shortly before Christmas 1949 so angered leaders they pushed for the creation of a statewide police agency.

3. AN HONEST MAN’S KILLING, A STATEWIDE LEGACY

J.T. Lutz was spending a quiet night at home with his young family when a shotgun blast shattered the window.

The Greene County man had vowed to help authorities catch a thief. Somebody else thought differently.

Lutz’s murder shortly before Christmas 1949 so angered leaders they pushed for creation of a statewide police agency.

Read more: Appalachian Unsolved: How a father of 7's killing spurred creation of the TBI

J.T. Lutz was spending a quiet night at home with his young family when a shotgun blast shattered the window. The Greene County man had vowed to help authorities catch a thief. Somebody else thought differently. Lutz's murder shortly before Christmas 1949 so angered leaders they pushed for the creation of a statewide police agency.

2. ONE SISTER LONELY, TWO SISTERS DEAD

Patricia Williams liked to go out and meet men. Older sister Suzanne was happy to stay home.

One night in 1987, somebody decided they both should die.

A closer look at this West Knox County case.

RELATED: Appalachian Unsolved: 30 years later, who strangled the sisters?

Wealthy Knoxvillian Rose Busch was home alone icing a cake when a killer knocked on her back door. Fifty years later, the murderer remains free. Bizarre clues left in the neighborhood included a gun silencer and a policeman's uniform. Why the case likely never will be solved.

1. THE SOCIALITE MURDERED WHILE MAKING A CAKE

Wealthy Knoxvillian Rose Busch was home alone icing a cake when a killer knocked on her back door.

Fifty years later, the murderer remains free.

Bizarre clues left in the neighborhood included a gun silencer and a policeman’s uniform.

Why the case likely never will be solved.

RELATED: Appalachian Unsolved: Murder in Sequoyah Hills