A motorist hit and killed a female bear Tuesday in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the fifth bear to be struck and killed by a vehicle this year, according to the National Park Service.

Park spokeswoman Dana Soehn said the bear was hit along Laurel Creek Road. She weighed about 120 pounds.

On average, 11 bears a year are killed by motorists, Soehn said.

RELATED: Don't do this: Tourists crowd right next to a bear in the Smokies

"Typically roadkill is higher during bad food years when bears are on the move in search of food," Soehn told 10News. "This is a pretty good food year so we’re seeing less movement."

Too Close to a bear
Kelly Helms

Laurel Creek is a well-traveled road that serves as a way to get from the Townsend Wye to Cades Cove.

Park visitors are seeing some bears out and about now.

Park officials urge the public, visiting the park in one of its busiest times, to always keep an eye out for wildlife.

Cub and Mother Black Bear Rainbow Falls Great Smoky Mountains Smokies GSMNP
A black bear cub and its mother feed on fall mast along Rainbow Falls trail in the Great Smoky Mountains.
WBIR

They also warn against interacting with or getting near any animal. Getting too close could spook an animal, imperiling it or the visitor himself.

More bear stories:

RELATED: A beary good attempt: Bear tries to take a dip in Gatlinburg tourist's hot tub

RELATED: No rain, no problem for bears' fall food in Smokies

RELATED: 10Listens: What you need to know about bear hunting season

RELATED: Blount Co. man shot & killed black bear that threatened his dog

RELATED: Bear cubs lock themselves in a Gatlinburg van, then honk until a human let them out

RELATED: Not the ring bear-er: Black bear photobombs bride, groom in Gatlinburg

RELATED: Bear claws its way into the back of a Pigeon Forge family's house

RELATED: So adorable: Baby bears cross the road with mama in North Carolina mountains

RELATED: A closed van door doesn't stop a curious momma bear & her cubs

RELATED: Adorable! Watch as Gatlinburg bear cubs hop in a hot tub to beat the heat, cuddle with mom

RELATED: Woman knocked over by bear during hike on Appalachian Trail

RELATED: Weeks after bear video goes viral, Smokies officials hope people actually get the message about approaching wildlife

RELATED: Tourists in the Smokies learn about bear safety