A Kodak man was killed Thursday morning when his plane crashed at the Gatlinburg-Pigeon Forge Airport in Sevierville.

Ray Allen Irwin, 62, was piloting the single engine aircraft and was the only one on board, officials confirmed Friday morning.

The NTSB and the FAA are investigating. The lead investigator from the NTSB is scheduled to update the media at 3 p.m. Friday.

Billie Schnick lives near the crash site.

“The smoke got so bad right here I couldn’t see anything," she told 10News. "It was pure black smoke."

"There was a pop," she added. "Then I realized there was no plane noise whatsoever."

Billie Schnick lives near the crash site. She said she heard a pop before the aircraft went down.

Schnick said she and neighbors tried to help get the pilot out before crews arrived.

"He was burned," she said. "It was terrible."

Sevierville Police said it appears the plane hit the ground while landing, then rotated 180 degrees, and stopped about 10 to 15 feet off the runway near a wooded area. When authorities arrived it was fully engulfed in flames.

Sevierville Police Department Detective Kevin Bush said there were no radio distress calls from the pilot before the crash.

Authorities described the pilot as a frequent flyer of the plane, but the pilot did not own it.

Detective Bush said the owner of the plane has been notified and they're working to get in contact with the pilot's next of kin. The aircraft is registered to a Sevierville address, according to FAA records.

The pilot's body will be taken to the Knoxville Forensic Center for an autopsy.

The crash comes after a fatal sightseeing helicopter crash in Pigeon Forge killed five people on April 4.

Bush said crews from the crash in Pigeon Forge helped with Thursday's investigation.

"Unfortunately, several weeks ago we had a helicopter in Pigeon Forge," Bush said. "Today they reciprocated. The helicopter was in Pigeon Forge city limits, and this one just happened to be ours. But, they went ahead, and fire command for Pigeon Forge showed up as mutual aid."

Bush said it "means a lot" that the investigating crews from April's crash in Pigeon Forge helped with Thursday's crash.

<p>Wreckage of the Beech Bonanza at the end of the runway.</p>

A number of different law enforcement agencies responded to the airport crash, including the Sevierville Fire Department, Sevierville Police Department, Pigeon Forge Police Department and Pigeon Forge Fire Department.