Most of the nation will set their clocks forward one hour this Sunday, and Sen. Marco Rubio is hoping to make the change stick. 

The Florida Sen. is expected to reintroduce the his Sunshine Protection Act, which would make Daylight Saving Time permanent for all of the United States, several media outlets in Florida report. 

The bill was originally filed on March 12, 2018, but it didn't advance. Then-governor Rick Scott had just signed a bill into law to have Florida stay on Daylight Saving Time year round earlier that week. Congress still hasn't approved the measure. 

“Studies have shown many benefits of a year-round daylight saving time, which is why Florida’s Legislature overwhelmingly voted to make it permanent last year. Reflecting the will of the State of Florida, I’m proud to reintroduce this bill to make Daylight Saving Time permanent nationally,” Rubio said in a statement to the South Florida Sun Sentinal

Supporters of a permanent daylight saving time say that increased sunlight in the evening hours would prevent car crashes, decrease crime and save energy. But the law would mean that for some winter months, the sun wouldn't rise until after 8 a.m,. potentially endangering young students.

“Darkness for our children in the morning, especially our students who walk to school or are standing at bus stops in the dark, causes great safety concerns for us,” Linda Kearschner, a former PTA president told the Daytona Beach News Journal.

“These students would be waiting for buses or walking to school in the dark making them more difficult to see and potentially creating safety issues for our children as they cross streets or wait at intersections.” 

Currently, states are able to opt out of daylight saving time permanently. Arizona and Hawaii stay in standard time year round.