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City of Knoxville asks for public input in identifying popular roadways with excessive speeding

The City plans to use the input to identify what roads experience excessive speeding and to help traffic planners develop tools that will mitigate the issue.

KNOXVILLE, Tenn — The City of Knoxville is asking the public to fill out a short survey about speeding that occurs on busy roads throughout the city.

The City plans to use the input to identify what roads experience excessive speeding and to help traffic planners develop tools that will mitigate the issue. 

Traffic-calming devices, like speed-humps, have been installed in some smaller residential streets but these typically aren't an option for areas with large volumes of traffic. 

Preliminary traffic data analysis has identified some popular roadways in Knoxville. These streets are highlighted in the survey:

  • Bob Gray Road
  • Cecil Avenue 
  • Cedar Lane, Central Street
  • Cherokee Trail 
  • Deane Hill Drive
  • Fifth Avenue
  • Gleason Drive
  • Inskip Road/Bruhin Road
  • Lonas Drive
  • Lyons View Pike
  • Main Street
  • Morrell Road
  • Pleasant Ridge Road
  • Sutherland Avenue
  • Texas Avenue
  • Washington Pike 
  • Woodland Avenue

In the Edgewood Park neighborhood, Heidi Schmutzler and her husband have advocated for traffic-calming measures.

"We have a lot of speeders. Obviously, we have a nice straight cut-through in our neighborhood," Schmutzler said. "We've seen several telephone poles taken out front porches taken out. Unfortunately, pets and people have both gotten hit."

She said they've worked with the city to create a plan to install carve-outs along Edgewood Avenue. 

"We have worked furiously to send out flyers, go door to door and get neighborhood buy-in," she said. "[The city] is considering installing carve-outs where you kind of narrow the street a little bit so it forces you to pay attention and slow down a bit as you go through different areas of Edgewood."

The Edgewood Avenue project is waiting on funding. Feedback through the survey can be directed towards any roadway in the city. 

Participants of the survey are also asked to identify streets where residents have concerns about not only speeding but safety, frequent congestion, or bicycle and pedestrian conflicts with vehicles.

The survey is now open and remains available through Jan. 23.

You can find the survey here.